navbar
line


treepricebox
See  our hedging offers - here
See our hand selected starter trees for bonsai - here
Click image to enlarge
wpda0e7eed.png

Trees & Shrubs

 

Starter trees

 

Hedging

 

Bonsai

 

Eco-friendly Gardening

 

Garden design

 

Pet Baskets

 

Baskets and Trugs

 

Gift Hampers

 

Gift ideas

 

Gift Tokens

 

Handcrafted cards

 

Seeds

 

Tropical seeds

 

Seed Germination

 

Perennial Plants

 

Bamboo

 

Grasses

 

Terms & Conditions

 

Delivery / Charges

 

Stock availabilty

 

Product Finder

 

Special Offers

 

Payment Methods

Tree Sitemap

Garden Sundries

 

Nesting Boxes

 

Gardening Books

 

Garden tools

 

Top Soil

Gardening DVD’s

 

Contact Us

If our website does not fit your screen properly - click here

The Rampant Gardener

The Rampant Gardener

The Common Horse-chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) is a large deciduous tree, native to a small area in the mountains of the Balkans in southeast Europe, mainly in north eastern Greece but also locally in Albania and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. It is widely cultivated throughout the temperate world.
It grows to 36 m tall, with a domed crown of stout branches, on old trees the outer branches often pendulous with curled-up tips. The leaves are opposite and palmately compound, with 5-7 leaflets; each leaflet is 10-25 cm long, making the whole leaf up to 50 cm across, with a 20 cm petiole. The flowers are usually white with a small red spot; they are produced in spring in erect panicles 10-20 cm tall with about 20-50 flowers on each panicle. Usually only 1-5 fruit develop on each panicle; the fruit is a green, softly spiky capsule containing one (rarely two or three) nut-like seeds called horse chestnuts and also known as conkers. Each conker is 2-4 cm diameter, glossy nut-brown with a whitish scar at the base.

Cultivation
Cultivation for its spectacular spring flowers is successful in a range of climatic conditions provided summers are not too hot
In Britain, the nuts are used for the popular children's game Conkers. During the two world wars, horse-chestnuts were used as a source of starch


Aesculus Hippocastanum - Horse Chestnut
Aesculus Hippocastanum
Horse Chestnut
wp141787c5.jpg
wp39df0d43_0f.jpg
wp5f186a2e_0f.jpg
Starter trees are 40 - 60 cm high
1 - 3 £4.00 each
4 - 6 £3.50 each
7+    £3.00 each

 

 

Return to main page
Return to main page